On The Same Poem, a poetry project of On the Same Page, the county’s annual Community Read Program, has become a staple of National Poetry Month in Forsyth County. On The Same Poem is the shared community experience of reading and discussing a single poem or poet to promote appreciation of poetry and to spark dialogue between diverse segments of the population. The project includes a luncheon with a distinguished poet at the Central Library and poetry slams and poetry contests throughout the county library system.

The On the Same Poem luncheon has become a staple of National Library Week/National Poetry Month in Forsyth County. It is a programming concept that originated at FCPL and has attracted the attention of Poet’s House, a national organization that seeks to encourage innovative poetry programming in public libraries across the country. Over a brown bag lunch, the visiting poet reads his poem. Participants discuss the poem, facilitated by discussion leaders at each table, and the program concludes with question and answer with the poet

Jaki

This year, we have the pleasure of sharing the love of poetry with North Carolina’s Poet Laureate, Jaki Shelton Green. She is the first African American, and third woman, to be appointed N.C. poet Laureate. Celebrate her and six young winners of our On the Same Poem poetry contest at the Brown Bag Luncheon on Thursday, April 18 at noon in the Central Library Auditorium. There will be poetry readings, discussions and book signing. Bring a lunch. Drinks and desserts will be provided. No reservation is required.












For more information about the On the Same Poem luncheon and other poetry programs throughout the month of April, please download our program brochure or call your local branch library.

On the Same Poem Programs, April 2019

“i know the grandmother one had hands”

i know the grandmother one had hands
but they were always in bowls
folding, pinching, rolling the dough
making the bread
i know the grandmother one had hands
but they were always under water
sifting rice
blueing clothes
starching lives
i know the grandmother one had hands
but they were always in the earth
planting seeds
removing weeds
growing knives
burying sons
i know the grandmother one had hands
but they were always under
the cloth
pushing it along
helping it birth into
skirt
dress
curtains to lock out
night
i know the grandmother one had hands
but they were always inside
the hair
parting
plaiting
twisting it into rainbows
i know the grandmother one had hands
but they were always inside
pockets
holding the knots
counting the twisted veins
holding onto herself
lest her hands disappear
into sky
i know the grandmother one had hands
but they were always inside the clouds
poking holes for the
rain to fall.